Tag: Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald ash borer S shaped galleries

Five Common Questions about the Emerald Ash Borer in Wilmington

An invasive insect species that made its way to the United States years ago is causing significant damage to the nation’s forests. Already discovered in 35 states, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a substantial threat to residents and businesses in Delaware.

FAQs about the Emerald Ash Borer in Wilmington

Certified Arborists in Wilmington, and across the country, are deeply concerned about the rapid spread of the emerald ash borer, so we at Stein Tree Service have put together a small FAQ to let people know about this new insect threat.

What is the Emerald Ash Borer?

Inspect for Emerald Ash Borer infestation - Stein Tree Service - 1000

The EAB is a small species of beetle native to Asia but accidentally brought to America sometime in the late 1990s. The insect is about the length of a dime, around 8.5 millimeters or 1/3 of an inch, and notable for its extremely brilliant metallic green shell and wings.

EABs lay their eggs (around 60 to 90 eggs a lifetime) beneath the bark of ash trees, which hatch into larvae that quickly begin consuming the flesh of the tree underneath. As the larvae feed on the ash tree and grow into adults, the beetles make their way to the exterior of the tree before mating and laying more eggs. The end result is an unhealthy, or even dead, ash tree, and more beetles that can spread quickly throughout a forest or urban environment.

Why Should I Care About The EAB?

In one sense, Delaware is lucky: we have relatively few ash trees, only around 2% of the population. However, while ash trees make up a small portion of Delaware’s native forests, urban areas can have ash trees as the prominent large street tree. So if you own any ashes – or white fringe trees – you absolutely should care because EABs can be deadly to any American ash species.

How Does The EAB Spread?

Like many infesting insects, emerald ash borer in Wilmington spreads via firewood, timber, or transplanted saplings. One of the sea venues likely brought them to America in the first place. The insects also have wings and are capable of migrating under their own power. While EAB can spread to other trees by flying, its rapid spread along the east coast is mainly due to being transported by those external means mentioned earlier.

How Do I Spot Signs Of EAB Infestation?

An emerald ash borer infestation can take a long time to show visible signs. Here are the main symptoms of an EAB infestation to look for:

  • Unexplained die-off on the upper canopy
  • Small tufted shoots on the trunk, called epicormic branching
  • Distinctive D-shaped holes left by emerging larvae
  • Vertical bark splits
  • Excessive woodpecker damage, from woodpeckers eating larvae

How Can My Trees Be Saved If They Have EAB?

Left untreated, EAB will eventually be fatal to ash or white fringe trees. If more than 30-40% of the tree’s canopy is already gone, chances are the tree is too damaged to survive. Otherwise, it can be possible to save the tree. Sustained pesticide usage is the normal course of action, and advance use of treatment may prevent an infestation.

Call Wilmington’s Stein Tree Service for Professional Tree Care and Emerald Ash Borer Concerns

Stein Tree Service has been providing skilled care of trees in Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Maryland for over 35 years. If you believe you have seen emerald ash borer in Wilmington, or signs of damage, contact one of our tree care specialists immediately to discuss your options.

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Inspect for Emerald Ash Borer infestation - Stein Tree Service - 1000

Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine Areas

Stein has a permit to work in spotted lanternfly quarantine areas in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Tree Service Companies have to be trained in proper moving and disposal of materials to avoid spread of the spotted lanternfly and Stein has completed the training courses.

Read more

Inspect for Emerald Ash Borer infestation - Stein Tree Service - 1000

Emerald Ash Borer Inspection

In the spring, destructive ash borer (EAB) adult beetles begin to emerge.  These invasive pests can destroy your ash trees.  Our specialists are certified to treat for EAP in Pennsylvania and Delaware.  For A free consultation, contact us today.

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Emerald Ash Borer – Invasive Species Highly Destructive to Ash Trees

The emerald ash borer (EAB, or Agrilus planipennis) is a green beetle native to Asia and Eastern Russia. Outside its native region, the emerald ash borer is an invasive species, and emerald ash borer infestation is highly destructive to ash trees, having infested millions of ash trees in its introduced range. The Emerald Ash Borer was first discovered in the United States in Michigan in 2002. It is believed to have been brought to North America unintentionally in ash wood used to stabilize crates during shipping. Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week is May 23 -29 in 2021, so Stein Tree Service offers information about this invasive pest.

Life Cycle of the Emerald Ash Borer

A key part of emerald ash borer awareness is knowing the emerald ash borer life cycle. Understanding the life cycle will help you understand what to do when you see any activity on or around your property. Below are the different life cycle stages of this highly destructive invasive species.

Signs of Emerald Ash Borer

Adults

The adult emerald ash borer is a dark metallic green, bullet-shaped beetle, and about 1/3 inch long (8.5 millimeters), and 1/16 inch wide (1.6 mm). The body is narrow and elongated, and the head is flat with black eyes. After emergence, adults fly into the ash canopy, where they feed on leaves throughout their lives. EAB adults start mating one week after emergence, and females begin laying eggs 2–3 weeks later. A typical female will lay approximately 100 eggs during her 2-month life; 56% of these eggs, on average, will be female. EAB adults are readily observed mating and egg-laying on the trunks of ash trees on warm, sunny afternoons and evenings in the field. The adults of both sexes are strong fliers.

Eggs

A female EAB may lay more than 100 eggs in her lifetime, depositing them individually or in groups on the bark of ash trees along the trunk and portions of the major branches. Eggs are laid in areas where the bark is rough and between bark layers or in bark crevices. 

Eggs are approximately 1.0 mm long x 0.6 mm wide and creamy white when laid; fertile eggs gradually turn amber after a few days and hatch after about two weeks.

Larvae 

Newly hatched larvae bore through the bark to the phloem and outer layer of new sapwood, where they feed until the weather gets too cold in the fall. There are four stages of larval development (instars). As they feed, the larvae create long serpentine galleries filled with frass, which enlarge in width as they grow.

Larvae are creamy-white and dorso-ventrally flattened. When fully mature, fourth-instar larvae are 26 to 32 mm long. Their head is mainly retracted into the prothorax with only the dark brown mouth parts visible. The prothorax is enlarged, with the mesothorax and metathorax narrower. Larvae have 10 bell-shaped abdominal segments and a pair of small brown structures called urogomphi, which are characteristic of all larvae in the genus Agrilus.

Overwintering Larvae, Pre-pupae, Pupae, and Adults

In the fall, mature fourth-instar emerald ash borer larvae excavate pupal chambers in the sapwood or outer bark where they fold into overwintering “J-shaped larvae.” In the spring, the J-shaped larvae shorten into prepupae then shed their cuticle to become naked pupae. Pupae are initially creamy white, but the eyes turn red, and the bodies begin to darken as they develop.

Another critical aspect of emerald ash borer awareness is identifying signs of infestation. Adults chew D-shaped exit holes through the bark to emerge from infested trees and can immediately fly upon emergence. EAB larvae that are immature as cold weather arrives in the fall will overwinter in their larval gallery. Larger larvae complete development the following spring, whereas smaller larvae may require another summer of feeding to complete development.

Emerald Ash Borer Larvae

Effect on trees

The most significant damage to a tree by EAB infestation occurs when the insect is in its larval stage. The larvae feed on the conductive tissue of the tree. This tissue transfers nutrients and water from the roots to the leaves, and when this is disturbed, the infested ash tree begins to die. At the onset of winter, the larvae relocate to the tree’s bark, effectively cutting off the tissue more. This ultimately results in the death of a tree. This can take place over several years, and the first noticeable sign is usually some die back in the crown of the tree. The tree will usually be dead by the following year or soon after. In areas where the insect is invasive and has no natural predators, it can and usually does have a devastating effect on the local ash tree population.

Treatment

Prevention of the emerald ash borer infestation is possible by injecting a systemic insecticide into the base of the tree. This treatment can prevent damage to the tree for up to two years. Note that arborists must reapply application every two years. Soil injections are another option for the prevention of EAB. These insecticides are injected directly into the soil surrounding the tree’s base and are then transported through the rest of the tree via the roots. For these treatments to have the greatest effect, the soil must be moist when applied. Waterlogged or dry soils will result in less insecticide being absorbed into the tree.

emerald ash borer spread

Arborists can use two insecticide spray treatments. The first is a spray that is applied to the trunk and absorbed through the bark. This treatment is less invasive to the tree and soil. However, if the tree has thick bark, absorption is slow and limited. The second spray treatment is a protective cover spray applied to the branches and trunk of the tree. This treatment kills adult beetle and newly hatched larva; however, it will not kill eggs.

Contact Stein Tree Service for A FREE, No-Obligation Consultation

If you want to keep your trees safe during emerald ash borer awareness week and all year, contact Stein Tree Service at (302) 478-3511 to request your free, no-obligation consultation with one of our ISA Board Certified Arborists.

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Featured Programs

Inspect for Emerald Ash Borer infestation - Stein Tree Service - 1000

Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine Areas

Stein has a permit to work in spotted lanternfly quarantine areas in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Tree Service Companies have to be trained in proper moving and disposal of materials to avoid spread of the spotted lanternfly and Stein has completed the training courses.

Read more

Inspect for Emerald Ash Borer infestation - Stein Tree Service - 1000

Emerald Ash Borer Inspection

In the spring, destructive ash borer (EAB) adult beetles begin to emerge.  These invasive pests can destroy your ash trees.  Our specialists are certified to treat for EAB in Pennsylvania and Delaware.  For A free consultation, contact us today.

Read more

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week is Feb 22-26, 2021

Feb 19, 2021 – Wilmington, DE – As a local tree care company, Stein Tree Service reminds Delaware and Pennsylvania residents that next week is National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW). The week, held this year from Feb 22-26 and organized by the nonprofit NAISMA (North American Invasive Species Management Association), encourages awareness of invasive plants and insects. Multiple webinars are being offered by NAISMA, and many areas also have local events to encourage awareness.

Emerald Ash Borer and Spotted Lanternfly- Stein Tree
Emerald Ash Borer and Spotted Lanternfly- Lanternfly image courtesy of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

The term “invasive species” refers to any non-native plant, insect or animal that is introduced into a region and causes some type of damage.

Invasive plants such as the colorful Japanese barberry, English ivy, or periwinkle, can disrupt or destroy a local ecosystem by choking out native plants that are food sources or habitats for insects or animals in the area. Those creatures may be a food source or a producer for others in the area and when one piece of the ecology is disrupted, others may follow.

Invasive Insects

Delaware and Pennsylvania have a number of common invasive insects. Events such as the NISAW help increase awareness of these dangerously destructive creatures, which is critical to saving affected trees and preventing their spread.

Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer, which was just discovered in Delaware for the first time in 2017 has moved rapidly through areas across the United States since its first sighting in 2002. The emerald ash borer primarily attacks ash trees, which flourish in Delaware and Pennsylvania climates, but has recently been found to be attracted to fringe trees as well.

The emerald ash borer can cause such damage to an ash tree as to completely destroy it within a couple of years. The beetle consumes the nutrients of the tree, beginning with the inner wood under the bark as larvae, and then as adults, from the tree’s canopy.

If the emerald ash borer is discovered early enough, a professional tree care company may be able to save the affected trees. The key is to be vigilant, looking for any signs of the insect or of loss of vigor in your trees.
Signs of the emerald ash borer include:

  • Galleries under the bark are formed as the emerald ash borer larvae moves and eats under the surface.
  • D-shaped holes in bark which are created as larvae emerge from under the bark
  • Excessive woodpecker activity may indicate EAB presence because woodpeckers feed on the EAB larvae. The birds damage trees further by stripping the bark off to get to their prey.
  • Crown Thinning occurs during an extended infestation because the nutrients and water supply to the top of the tree are disrupted.
  • Epicormic Sprouting can occur when EAB is present or as indication of some other sort of sickness or infestation. Even if the culprit is something other than EAB, you should have a professional inspect the tree.

Spotted Lanternfly

The spotted lanternfly presence has grown tremendously in Delaware and Pennsylvania. The insect spreads easily through transportation on vehicles or on items carried from one place to another.

The spotted lanternfly threatens local agriculture by causing damage to hardwood trees, grapes, apples and more. The insect is attracted to trees such as the tree of heaven (Ailanthus alitissima), another invasive plant species commonly found in local areas.

The insects are easy to spot when their wings are spread because they have small but bright red wings with white spots. When they are at rest however, they are a brownish gray color with black spots. You may see them gathered on tree trunks, or you may see the egg masses. These masses look like a smear of mud or rows of seeds. Hatching season is late April and early May, so now is the perfect time to look for them.

The NISAW encourages all types of invasive species awareness, but the emerald ash borer and the spotted lanternfly are definite local threats that homeowners should be aware of. Spring is a good time to schedule an inspection of the trees in your landscape to ensure that they are healthy and free of problematic issues.

Contact Stein Tree Service for Invasive Species Awareness and Treatment

Stein Tree Service is the oldest independently owned tree care service company in Delaware. We are licensed to perform inspections and treat for emerald ash borer in Delaware and Pennsylvania, and to work in any spotted lanternfly quarantine areas. Our professional certified arborists and specialists are dedicated to exceptional tree care. For more information about invasive species awareness or our services, call 302-478-3511 or visit the company website at: www.SteinTree.com.

 

 

 

winter storm - Stein Tree Service

How does EAB Survive the Winter?

The wintertime cold temperatures kill off many insects and pests. One pest, however, can survive the cold winter temperatures: emerald ash borer (EAB.) Emerald ash borer has been a destructive, invasive species in the United States for years, and while EAB is most active during spring and summer, these pests spend the winter preparing to feed on nearby ash trees. EAB survive the winter due to them living within trees and a natural “supercooling” ability.

How does EAB Survive the Winter? Trees

Emerald Ash Borer on a branch | Invasive Species Awareness | Stein Tree Service

One reason that EAB survive the winter is the protection that ash trees provide. When female emerald ash borer lay their eggs between June and August, the beetles lay eggs between layers of outer bark and cracks and crevices of the trunk and major branches. Once the eggs hatch, the larvae burrow deeper into the tree, feeding on the tree until becoming adults in early spring. The outer bark provides insulation to EAB from the cold weather, so the in-tree temperature is more relevant to EAB’s survival than the temperature outside the tree. Trees that receive much sunlight in the winter can also be warmer despite the cold weather. The other primary reason these beetles can survive cold weather is supercooling.

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Supercooling

Supercooling is a process of lowering the temperature of gasses or liquids below the freezing points without becoming solids. Many animals use supercooling by producing antifreeze proteins that bind to ice crystals, preventing water molecules from binding to the ice crystals and preventing the ice from spreading. Insects can also produce these proteins and other sugars or alcohols to prevent themselves from freezing. Supercooling is somewhat common among insects, and that process is the other major reason why EAB survive the winter.

People walking in park, with snow and trees

Emerald ash borer’s supercooling has a limit on how low the temperature can get to be useful. Most research has shown that a significant portion of larvae begins to die at around -10°F, and the number increases the lower the temperature goes. The extremely cold weather conditions needed to do so are much more common in northern, colder regions such as the Midwest or Canada. Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland winters are unlikely to be cold enough or may only have short extreme cold snaps instead.

What You Can Do During Winter

If you want to keep your trees safe from the effects of EAB, here are a few things you can do during the winter, while EAB larvae are dormant and have yet to spread to other trees.

  • Look for signs of emerald ash borer on your property and among your trees.
  • Get your trees inspected by a professional, certified arborist.
  • Remove EAB-infested trees and care for surrounding trees to reduce the risk of future infestation.

Between October and May is when EAB activity is lowest, so getting your trees inspected (and removed if necessary) will significantly reduce the chance of nearby trees becoming infested.

Contact Stein Tree for Winter Tree Care Services

While the EAB survive the winter, you can contact Stein Tree Service to inspect your trees and manage destructive pests on your property. Stein’s team of ISA certified arborists has hundreds of years of combined experience and knowledge of pest control and EAB management techniques. Our team has provided residents in Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland with tree care services for decades. We strive to maintain your trees’ health, beauty, and value. For more information on our other services, contact us today.

galleries are one of the signs of emerald-ash-borer-infestation - stein tree service

Signs of Emerald Ash Borer

Fall has arrived, and we want to let homeowners know that fall and winter are great times to get trees inspected for pests or diseases. One major pest to look out for is the emerald ash borer (EAB): an invasive species that feeds on ash trees and has done immense damage to trees across the entire United States. Fall, winter, and early spring are the best times for detecting any signs of emerald ash borer, because fewer leaves are present to hide the pest. This season is also an ideal time for removing infected trees.

Signs of Emerald Ash Borer Infection

Emerald ash borer | invasive species in Delaware | Stein Tree Service

One of the main reasons that fall and winter are ideal for detecting the emerald ash borer’s presence is that trees lose their leaves. The emerald ash borers burrow into the bark and lay their larvae inside the tree, making them difficult to spot on trees with a lot of leaves. EAB is difficult to spot because the beetles have a metallic green colored body, an effective camouflage during the spring and summer when trees have a lot of green leaves on them. The leaves can also hide other signs of emerald ash borer presence.

Other Signs of Emerald Ash Borer Infestation:

  • Distinct D-shaped holes in the bark
  • Bark splitting
  • Canopy thinning

Increased or unusually high woodpecker activity can be another sign, as woodpeckers feed on emerald ash borer.

Learn more about the Dangers of EAB

Removing Infected Trees in Fall & Winter

Emerald ash borer s shaped galleries - Wilmington DE

Removing trees infested with EAB can be carefully done anytime, but the ideal times to remove trees is during the fall and winter. From October to May, EAB is mostly inactive, with the larvae burrowed under the bark of a tree. The dormancy is a result of the beetles protecting themselves from the cold weather. Because the pest is mostly dormant during the winter, the chances of them spreading is reduced. Therefore, the ideal time to remove infested trees is between October and May when the risk of other ash trees becoming infested is the lowest.

Contact Stein Tree for Emerald Ash Borer Removal Services

If you are concerned about your trees’ health and the risk of emerald ash borer infection, contact Stein Tree Service. Stein Tree is a professional licensed tree care business in Wilmington, Delaware. We provide pest removal and plant and tree care services for many communities around Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. Our certified arborists are experienced in the safest, most effective measures to prevent and remove pests from your landscape and maintain your trees’ health. For more information on signs of emerald ash borer and how to keep your trees safe, contact Stein today.

Emerald ash borer S shaped galleries

Stein Provides Emerald Ash Borer Spread Update

For years, the emerald ash borer has caused severe damage to ash trees within the United States. As an invasive species, emerald ash borer has spread rapidly since the beetle was first discovered in the U.S. in 2002. Both federal and state governments have issued quarantines to curb the spread and reduce the pest’s impact. Over the years, some quarantine regulations have been adjusted to account for changes in the beetle’s presence. Below is an emerald ash borer spread update to help keep your trees safe.

Emerald Ash Borer Spread Update: New Counties

Map of emerald ash borer spread in United States | emerald ash borer spread update | Stein Tree Service
Image of EAB spread, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Initial County Detections July 2020

New counties across the United States have recently detected instances of emerald ash borer. Most of the new counties that have detected EAB are in the Midwest region (Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin) and New England (Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine) but several new counties in NC have reported EAB as well. The emerald ash borer has been detected as far west as Texas and Colorado but has only been found in a few counties there. Every county in Pennsylvania has reported EAB presence, but so far in Delaware EAB presence has remained low.

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Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine Deregulation

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, proposed to deregulate the EAB quarantine in 2018. The proposal would divert resources from local regulatory activities (issuing permits, making site visits, and more) towards managing EAB spread, such as releasing more biological control agents that are natural predators of the EAB to prevent further spread. The open comment period for these new proposals closed on November 19, 2018, but no decision has been reached to date.

The quarantine regulates moving ash trees, logs, or hardwood firewood in and out of states where EAB instances are confirmed. Firewood is a primary way that the pest has been able to spread between different states quickly. Some may unknowingly transport EAB infested firewood or logs across state borders.

Contact Stein for Certified Professional Emerald Ash Borer Inspection and Treatment

If you want to keep aware of the emerald ash borer spread update and preserve your trees’ health, contact Stein Tree Service. Stein Tree is a professional, licensed, tree care business. We have served many communities in Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland with tree care services and treatment for pests such as emerald ash borer. Our arborists are certified and know the best and safest insecticides and preventive measures to maintain your trees’ health. For more information on how to keep your trees safe from emerald ash borer, contact Stein today.

galleries are one of the signs of emerald-ash-borer-infestation - stein tree service

Emerald Ash Borer FAQs

The emerald ash borer (EAB) continues to be a significant problem for Pennsylvania and Delaware, and residents should be more aware to help protect their trees. To educate our customers and community about the dangers the emerald ash borer presents, Stein Tree has gathered some Emerald Ash Borer FAQs.

How Does EAB Kill Trees?

Emerald ash borer up-close view | Emerald Ash Borer FAQs | Stein Tree Service

An adult beetle lays eggs within the bark of an ash tree, which hatches about two weeks later. Once hatched, the larvae begin feeding on the bark, eating the inner tissue layers of the tree. The tissues that EAB larvae feed on are responsible for transporting nutrients and water. How long a tree takes to die after becoming infected depends on the size of the tree and the EAB population. Generally, infested small trees may die within 1-2 years, while large trees can be killed in 3-4 years.

Do All Ash Trees Get Emerald Ash Borer?

Almost all ash trees are at risk if the emerald ash borer continues to spread. American mountain-ash, or Sorbus americana, is one species of ash tree that has yet to be affected by emerald ash borer, as the species is not considered a true ash tree. EAB prefers ash trees that are stressed by disease or drought, but the pest will attack healthy trees as well.

Do Emerald Ash Borers Eat Other Trees?

Emerald ash borers almost exclusively feed on ash trees. In North America, the beetle has also been found to attack white fringetree, which is a non-ash species. However, the only widespread reports of trees damaged by EAB are about ash trees.

Cost of Treating Trees for Emerald Ash Borer

The cost of treating trees for emerald ash borer varies depending on how early the treatment begins and the severity of the damage. Price also depends on the size and the number of trees that need treatment.

How Can I Detect EAB?

The signs of an infestation can take a significant amount of time to be visible but can be spotted with diligence. Below are some of the main signs used to determine an EAB infestation:

  • Unexplained die-off on the upper canopy
  • Small tufted shoots on the trunk, called epicormic branching
  • Distinctive D-shaped holes left by emerging larvae
  • Vertical bark splits
  • Excessive woodpecker damage, from woodpeckers eating larvae

How Can We Get Rid of EAB?

The best method of getting rid of EAB is to be diligent of any signs or symptoms in your area and call a professional arborist to take care of the problem. First, professional arborists will be able to identify infestations accurately. Professional arborists who are certified to treat for EAB also have the knowledge, experience, and equipment to properly control and get rid of emerald ash borer while maintaining tree health.

Call Stein for Answers to Emerald Ash Borer FAQs, Inspection and Treatment

If you are concerned about emerald ash borer damaging your trees, contact Stein Tree Service. Our arborists, certified in Delaware and Pennsylvania for the treatment of EAB, know the best and safest preventive methods to help keep your trees safe. If you would like a free consultation or have any other emerald ash borer FAQs, contact Stein Tree Service.

Emerald ash borer S shaped galleries

Stein Recognizes Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week, May 20-26, 2020

Emerald ash borer up-close | Emerald ash borer awareness | Stein Tree Service

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been a significant problem in Pennsylvania, Delaware, and all across North America for years, and the pest will soon be emerging from its winter slumber. Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week, which will take place from May 20 to 26, 2020, is part of a more significant effort to inform residents and homeowners of the threat, how to spot signs of an EAB infestation, and what action to take.

The emerald ash borer is a metallic-green beetle that feeds on ash trees and has been an invasive species in the U.S. since 2002. Ash tree populations across many states have been destroyed. We recognize that many people are focused on other things due to COVID-19, but residents should continue to be diligent about tree care and health to avoid losing valuable trees.

How to Help During Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week

Here are some of the actions you can take to help prevent the spread of emerald ash borer and protect your trees during Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week.

Look For Signs of EAB Infestation

Due to the damage that these beetles can cause, we encourage homeowners to look for signs of possible EAB infestation. In the early stages, you may see a thinning of leaves at the top of a tree. At later stages, the tree bark begins splitting, and sprouts (epicormic shoots) may start coming from the tree base. Substantial woodpecker activity on the tree is also a sign, as woodpeckers feed on EAB larvae. Other symptoms of emerald ash borer activity include:

  • Yellowing of leaves
  • D-shaped exit holes
  • S-shaped galleries under the bark

Avoid Moving Firewood

An important reason why EAB is such a massive problem is that the beetles can easily transport from one area to another. One way that emerald ash borer moves is on firewood. As a result, many states regulate the movement of firewood to prevent the spread of EAB. The solution here is to buy local firewood, buy heat-treated certified firewood, or gather firewood on site when permitted.

Help Spread Awareness

Taking action during Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week, or anytime, helps preserve ash trees. When more homeowners and residents are aware of the threat and the signs of EAB, and what to do if activity is discovered, the chances for successfully treating an EAB infestation are better. If you spot any signs of emerald ash borer presence, report your findings and any questions about treatment of emerald ash borer to a certified arborist.

Call Stein for Certified Professional Emerald Ash Borer Inspection and Treatment

After identifying the signs and symptoms of emerald ash borer damage, the next step is to contact a professional, certified arborist. Stein Tree Service knows how to protect ash trees from emerald ash borer damage. Our EAB treatment certified arborists are certified to treat for EAB in Delaware and Pennsylvania, and are considered an essential business. We use the safest preventive methods and treatments to save your trees when possible. For more information on Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week or a free consultation, contact Stein Tree Service.

galleries are one of the signs of emerald-ash-borer-infestation - stein tree service

Inspect Your Trees Since the Adult Emerald Ash Borer Emerges in Spring

The adult emerald ash borer (EAB) has been a significant and destructive pest in Pennsylvania for years. First discovered in the United States in 2002, the emerald ash borer has caused considerable damage to ash trees across the United States, affecting both the environment and the economy. Because spring is when these adult beetles emerge and begin devouring the canopy of ash trees, we advise all residents to prepare and protect ash trees from this pest.

What Can You Do to Protect Your Trees from Adult Emerald Ash Borer?

Stein Tree Service recommends a few things that could help you protect your trees.

Inspect Your Trees Regularly

The adult emerald ash borer emerges in spring, but you should be on the lookout for them all year, as larvae activity damage can be seen when the trees are bare in winter.

Signs of Emerald Ash Borer Activity

Generally, the first major sign that EAB has infested a tree is a thinning of leaves at the top of the tree. Unfortunately if you see this symptom, your tree has likely been under attack for some time already. Other signs to look for include the following:

  • Yellowing of leaves
  • Epicormic shoots
  • D-shaped exit holes
  • S-shaped galleries under the bark
  • Unusual woodpecker activity

How to Help Protect Trees from Adult Emerald Ash Borer

Other ways to help protect ash trees from EAB include buying and burning only local firewood. Eggs and larvae can be carried on firewood, so keeping to this rule helps prevent the spread of EAB into uninfested areas. Educating others about emerald ash borer signs is another way to proactively protect the trees in your community.

Call Stein for Certified Professional Emerald Ash Borer Inspection and Treatment

If you notice any signs of emerald ash borer activity, either in your landscape or community, contact professional arborists to handle the issue. Tree care professionals have the experience, knowledge, and resources to treat ash trees and protect them from this invasive species. Although EAB can destroy trees, identifying the signs early and getting professional treatment can save your trees.

Stein Tree Service is experienced and able to identify adult emerald ash borer and larvae, and we are certified to treat for them in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Contact us for a free consultation today.

adult spotted lanternfly - stein tree service offers tree care services in all spotted lanternfly quarantine areas

Stein Discusses Invasive Species in Delaware

One threat that the Delaware environment faces is damage by invasive species. An invasive species is a non-native plant, insect or animal that is introduced into a region and causes some harm. That harm can affect plants or humans, and the damage can be economic or environmental. Many people have likely heard of some invasive species in their regions, but may be unaware of the harm caused by these species. Stein discusses a few of the invasive species in Delaware.

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